Thomas Paine in Violence: Blog

  • Resident HARP artist’s new album release - Sep. 20, 2016

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Monday
    8/15/2016

    Album art for minis/Trajectories

    Album art for minis/Trajectories

    Come support a new record by a HARP Artist on Sep. 20.

    When I'm not working on Thomas Paine in Violence, I'm creating work for and with my now-ten-year-old ensemble, thingNY. To celebrate the release of thingNY's new album, the HERE Arts Center will be hosting an album release party featuring live covers of the works on the album by a slew of great guests including: visionary composer and toy pianist Jerome Kitzke, Latin synth-star Helado Negro, theatrical-electro-percussion duo Radical 2, and cast members from the Broadway-bound Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812. Tickets are available with pre-purchase of the album. All the info is below.

    -Paul

    ---------

    thingNY
    minis/Trajectories
    a new album featuring the music of HARP Artist Paul Pinto and composer Erin Rogers

    Featuring Gelsey Bell, Hristina Blagoeva, Andrew Kozar, Will Lang, Andrew Livingston, Pat Muchmore, Josh Perry, Paul Pinto, Erin Rogers, Dave Ruder, Jeffrey Young

    Engineered, mixed and mastered by Joseph Branciforte

    Preorder now at thingny.com/ministrajectories

    Sep. 20, 2016 - Album Release Party
    7:30pm-10:00pm
    HERE Arts Center
    145 Sixth Ave.
    New York, NY
    thingNY w/ Jerome Kitzke, Helado Negro, Radical 2 and cast members of Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812 

    Gold Bolus Recordings GBR024

    The versatile multi-instrumentalists in composer collective thingNY, “one of New York’s most daring young opera companies” (Time Out New York), have worked a decade to hone a unique style of energetic and poetic music. That style reaches its fullest expression in their new album minis/Trajectories, comprising music written by two of thingNY’s core members, Paul Pinto and Erin Rogers. It will be available digitally and on CD on September 20, and in a special 12” vinyl edition on October 22.

    thingNY has a penchant for creating unusual, intricately crafted objects. Their first full-length album, ADDDDDDDDD, a “rapid-fire…pulse-racing...all consuming” electronic opera, was released as a CD tucked inside a colorful, quirky comic book libretto. Their next physical release was TIME: A Complete Explanation in Three Parts, a music-theatre piece documented in a 300-page hardcover tome complete with scores and cut-out tarot cards. To commemorate the ten-year anniversary of thingNY’s first show, the online and CD releases of minis/Trajectories will be supplemented on October 22 by 200 Special Limited Edition 12” Records, complete with audiophile 180g vinyl and beautifully engraved 12” x 12” scores of all the compositions.

    The album contains two works by saxophonist/composer Erin Rogers. Trajectories is a dynamic four-movement piece for six speaking-singing instrumentalists about life’s trajectories, combining improvisation and hyper-rhythmic composition, while Chronolinea is a subtle extended-technique concerto for soprano Gelsey Bell. thingNY founder, vocalist, and percussionist Paul Pinto offers up eight minis, scored for a melange of quick-tongued instrumentalists, and based on short, stream-of-conscious experiences of his own struggles with poverty, consumerism, sexual issues, food, jokes, and teaching children piano.

    2016 has been a banner year for thingNY, in which the group received awards from the Copland New Music Fund, the Amphion Foundation, New Music USA, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Network of Ensemble Theaters, and Chamber Music America.

    minis/Trajectories was created in partnership with engineer/co-producer Joseph Branciforte, who has worked on over 150 releases for artists including Tim Berne, Vijay Iyer, Ben Monder, Nels Cline, Marc Ribot, Steve Lehman, Mark Dresser, Tyshawn Sorey, Jen Shyu, Tom Rainey, and Matt Mitchell. The record is being released on Dave Ruder’s Gold Bolus Recordings, a label that works across genres and media to depict the creative output of NYC’s most inspiring oddballs.

     

  • The crux of Thomas Paine in Violence - Agrarian Justice (1797)

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Wednesday
    6/22/2016

    Like other artists who choose to develop a work over a significant amount of time, Thomas Paine in Violence began as one thing, but has been redefined as it has grown and deepened. In searching for what this odd piece was going to be "about", I just started reading and writing, and just this week finished the first draft of the full libretto.

    The majority of the story, if you can call it that, has become a reckoning Paine's egalitarian principles in Agrarian Justice with today's American society, through a lens of political radio pundits. In proper 21st century form, I did this by editing, shortening and sound-byting ideas in the text while trying to either preserve Paine's language, or infuse it with my own.

    Here's a first whack at an edit of Agrarian Justice, adapted from Paine's 1797 pamphlet. It's from the following text that everything else in Thomas Paine in Violence comes:

    ................

    To preserve the benefits of what we call civilized life, and, at the same time, to remedy the evil which it has produced, ought to be considered the first object of reformed legislation.

    Whether that state which is proudly, perhaps erroneously, called civilization, has most promoted or most injured the general happiness of the human race is a question that may be strongly contested. On one side, the spectator is dazzled by splendid appearances; on the other, shocked by extremes of wretchedness; both of which civilization has erected. The most affluent and the most miserable are to be found in countries that are called “civilized”.

    To understand what the state of society should be, it is necessary to have some idea of the natural and primitive state, in which there is not any of those spectacles of human misery and poverty. Poverty is a thing created by that which is called “civilized” life.

    Civilization, therefore, or that which is so-called, has operated two ways: to make one part of society more affluent, and the other more wretched, than would have been the lot of either in a natural state.

    The thing, therefore, now to be done is to remedy the evils and preserve the benefits that have arisen to society by passing from the natural to that which is called the “civilized” state.

    The first principle of civilization ought to have been, and ought still to be, that the condition of every person born into the world, after a state of civilization commences, ought not to be worse than if that person had been born before that period. But the fact is that the condition of millions, in every country, is far worse than if they had been born before civilization began.

    It is a position not to be controverted that the earth, in its natural state was, and ever would have continued to be, the common property of the human race. In that state every person would have been born to property, and thus a joint life-proprietor of the soil, and in all its natural productions, vegetable and animal.

    But the earth in its natural state is capable of supporting but a small number of inhabitants compared with what it is capable of doing in a cultivated state. And, as it is impossible to separate the improvement made by cultivation from the earth upon which that improvement has been made, the idea of landed property arose from that parable connection; but it is nevertheless true, that it is the value of the improvement, only, and not the earth itself, that is individual property.

    The value of the improvement has so far exceeded the value of the natural earth that the common right of all has become confounded into the cultivated right of the few.

    Every proprietor, therefore, of cultivated lands, owes to the community ground-rent for the land which they hold, and all accumulation of personal property, beyond what a man's own hands produce, is derived to him by living in a society, and he owes on every principle of justice, principle of gratitude, and principle of civilization, a part of that accumulation back again to society from whence the whole came.

    The human race did not make the earth, and though we have the natural right to occupy it, we have no natural right to locate as our property-in-perpetuity any part it.

    Cultivation is at least one of the greatest natural improvements ever made by human invention. It has given to the natural earth a tenfold value. But the landed monopoly that began with cultivation has produced that greatest evil. It has dispossessed its inhabitants of their natural inheritance, without providing for them, as ought to have been done, an indemnification for that loss, and has thereby created a species of poverty and wretchedness that did not exist before.

    In advocating the case of the persons thus dispossessed, it is a right, and not a charity, that I am pleading for.

    Having thus in a few words, opened the merits of the case, I shall now propose:

    To create a national fund, out of which there shall be paid to every person, when arrived at the age of twenty-one years, the sum of fifteen pounds sterling, as a compensation in part, for the loss of his or her natural inheritance, by the introduction of the system of landed property; And also, the sum of ten pounds per annum, during life, to every person now living, of the age of fifty years, and to all others as they shall arrive at that age.

    It is not charity but a right, not bounty but justice, that I am pleading for. The present state of civilization is as odious as it is unjust. It is absolutely the opposite of what it should be, and it is necessary that a revolution should be made in it. The contrast of affluence and wretchedness continually meets and offends the eye like dead bodies and living bodies chained together.

    It is justice, and not charity, that is the principle of the plan. In all great cases it is necessary to have a principle more universally active than charity; and, with respect to justice, it ought not to be left to the choice of detached individuals whether they will do justice or not. Considering, then, the plan on the ground of justice, it ought to be the act of the whole growing spontaneously out of the principles of the revolution, and the reputation of it ought to be national and not individual.

    It is the practice of what has unjustly obtained the name of civilization (and the practice merits not to be called either charity or policy) to make some provision for persons becoming poor and wretched only at the time they become so. Would it not, even as a matter of economy, be far better to adopt means to prevent their becoming poor? This can best be done by making every person when arrived at the age of twenty-one years an inheritor of something to begin with.

    The rugged face of society, checkered with the extremes of affluence and want, proves that some extraordinary violence has been committed upon it, and calls on justice for redress. The great mass of the poor in all countries are become an hereditary race, and it is next to impossible for them to get cut from that state by themselves. It ought also to be observed that this mass increases in all countries that are called “civilized”. More persons fall annually into it than get out of it. 

  • Meet the artists - CULTUREMART 2016

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Friday
    3/18/2016

    Joan La Barbara. Photo by Benjamin Heller.

    Joan La Barbara. Photo by Benjamin Heller.

    The Manchorus (L-R: Paul Pinto, Ryan Krause, Nick Choksi). Photo by Benjamin Heller.

    The Manchorus (L-R: Paul Pinto, Ryan Krause, Nick Choksi). Photo by Benjamin Heller.

    Lighting by Jeanette Yew. Pictured Paul Pinto and Ryan Krause. Photo by Benjamin Heller.

    Lighting by Jeanette Yew. Pictured Paul Pinto and Ryan Krause. Photo by Benjamin Heller.

    On March 8 and 9, Paul and the ensemble presented a 22-minute stab at a new opening for Thomas Paine in Violence. As the majority of the piece is a text-dense, lightning-speed mix of radical philosophy, political soapboxing, swearing, censorship, slam poetry, and shock jock punditry, we thought we'd try a little space. In this little prologue. We meet a slow-moving Spirit of Thomas Paine, uttering just a few words between decades of vocal silence. She sings with a mysterious Manchorus, that exists in her mind and in this radio station purgatory. 

    Meet the folks who made it happen.

    Gus Callahan (Sound) is an audio engineer, composer, and sound designer based in New York City. His current work focuses on recording and documenting spatial music in diverse environments - warehouses, galleries, churches, and concert venues. He has worked as an engineer in spaces such as The Knockdown Center, MoMA PS1, Fridman Gallery, Experimental Intermedia, and Film Anthology. Gus received his BA in Music Technology from NYU.

    Nick Choksi (Manchorus) Off Broadway: Natasha, Pierre & the Great Comet of 1812, Ars Nova/Kazino/A.R.T.; D Deb Debbie Deborah, Clubbed Thumb; Brooklynite!, Vineyard; Bunty Berman Presents, New Group (Lortel Nomination); Invasion!, The Flea; Annie Baker's Practice, The Atlantic; Rajiv Joseph’s Huck and Holden, Cherry Lane Theatre; Christopher Durang’s Triple Trouble with Love, 59E59 Theater; A Food Odyssey, Invisible Dog (also composed). Regional: Love's Labor’s Lost, RSC/Shakespeare Theater D.C.; Wind In The Willows, Two River. Film/TV: The Passing Season (upcoming), Home, Violet & Daisy, “Happyish”, “Royal Pains”, “L&O:CI”, “The Sopranos”, “The Electric Company”, “One Life To Life” (recurring). Training: Juilliard. Band: Those Lost Boys. nickchoksi.com

    Ryan Krause (Manchorus) is a musician based in Ridgewood, New York, where he works as a producer, composer, MC, and bandleader. His work largely focuses on the human voice, with contexts ranging from performance art and experimental opera, to rapping and stand up comedy, conceptual karaoke and improvised dancemusic. Krause studied Composition at the New England Conservatory and Literature at CUNY-Hunter. He’s currently one half of the duo Lipchitz, and frontperson of the big band Dear Leader. soundcloud.com/ryankrause109

    Joan La Barbara (Spirit) is a composer/performer/actor renowned for her unique vocabulary of experimental and extended vocal techniques influencing generations of composers and singers. Awards and prizes: Foundation for Contemporary Arts’ 2016 John Cage Award; DAAD-Berlin Artist-in-Residency; Civitella Ranieri, Guggenheim and 7 NEA Fellowships; numerous commissions for chamber ensembles, theater, orchestra, chorus, interactive technology, soundscores for dance, video and film, including electronic/vocal score for Sesame Street. Her multi-layered textural compositions premiered at Festival d'Automne à Paris, Brisbane Biennial, Lincoln Center, MaerzMusik Berlin, Warsaw Autumn, and many other international venues. La Barbara is on the artist faculties of NYU and Mannes/The New School and is composing a new opera. joanlabarbara.com

    Jeanette Oi-Suk Yew (Lighting). Her work was described as “…contains the vibrant richness of a Caravaggio painted in neon.” Recent: Normandy Sherwood’s Gentleman’s Choice, Tan Dun’s Water Passion at MET museum, Sam Falls’ September Spring at The Kitchen, Aya Ogaway’s Ludic Proxy, Stephan Weisman’s Scarlet Ibis and Kamala Sankaram’s Thumbprint at Prototype, Aaron Siegel’s Brother Brother with Experiments in Opera, Matthew Paul Olmos’ So Go the Ghosts of Mexico Part One, Erik Ehn’sSoulographie: Our Genocides, and Company XIV’s Snow White, Cinderella, Nutcracker Rouge and Rococo Rouge. Upcoming: The Idiotat HERE. NEA/TCG Career Development Program recipient. jeanetteyew.com

  • Faceoff from Culturemart 2016

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Wednesday
    3/16/2016

    The Spirit of Thomas Paine, comin' at you... live (Joan La Barbara). Photo by Benjamin Heller.

    The Spirit of Thomas Paine, comin' at you... live (Joan La Barbara). Photo by Benjamin Heller.

    The Manchorus... whatever that means (Paul Pinto, Ryan Krause, Nick Choksi). Photo by Benjamin Heller.

    The Manchorus... whatever that means (Paul Pinto, Ryan Krause, Nick Choksi). Photo by Benjamin Heller.

    Two shots from the 20-minute in-progress performance at Culturemart 2016.

  • CULTUREMART 2015: Thomas Paine in Violence photos by Benjamin Heller

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Wednesday
    3/25/2015

    Photo: Benjamin Heller. Scene from Act II: Hack It! L-R: Ryan Krause, Paul Pinto, Levy Lorenzo, Alejandro Acierto (back L-R: Jeffrey Young, Miguel Frasconi, Joan La Barbara, Shelley Burgon, Yves Dharamraj)

    Photo: Benjamin Heller. Scene from Act II: Hack It! L-R: Ryan Krause, Paul Pinto, Levy Lorenzo, Alejandro Acierto (back L-R: Jeffrey Young, Miguel Frasconi, Joan La Barbara, Shelley Burgon, Yves Dharamraj)

    New photos from our March 6 performance!

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/40007811@N05/sets/72157651251934456/

  • Meet the Cast and Crew of Culturemart

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Thursday
    3/5/2015

    Rick Burkhardt (Co-Librettist) studied music composition at Harvard University, the University of Illinois, and the University of California, San Diego, where he earned his Ph.D. in 2006. His original chamber music, theater, and text pieces have been performed in over forty US cities, as well as in Europe, Mexico, Canada, Taiwan, Australia, and New Zealand. He is a founding member of the Nonsense Company, a touring experimental music / theater trio, presenting new music and theater in unexpected combinations for a wide range of audiences across the US. He received an Obie Award for co-creating the play "Three Pianos" in 2010. 

    Alejandro T. Acierto (Manchorus) is an artist and musician working in time-based media. He has exhibited solo shows and performances in Chicago, Madison, Denver and Berlin and in group shows across the US. He is currently a 2014-2015 Chicago Artists Coalition HATCH Projects resident and has completed residencies at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, VCCA, Banff Centre, and HCL in Chicago. He is also a founding member and project curator of Ensemble Dal Niente in Chicago. Acierto holds degrees from DePaul University, Manhattan School of Music and an MFA from University Illinois at Chicago.

    Shelley Burgon (Shelley/Harp) is a harpist and sound artist based in New York. Her music centers around the sound of the harp, both as a traditional acoustic instrument in a chamber setting and as the primary sound source for her electronic music. Her sound art focuses on handmade electronic sound and light sculptures that combine scientific theories and mysticism.

    Yves Dharamraj (Yves/Cello) enjoys an international career as soloist, recitalist and chamber musician with appearances on many of the world’s biggest stages. Past highlights include concerto performances with the Houston Symphony, the Green Bay Symphony, the Asian Artists and Concerts Orchestra, and the Juilliard Orchestra, among others. Dr. Dharamraj currently is an artist fellow in the Academy, a collaboration between Juilliard, Carnegie Hall, the Weill Institute of Music, and the NYC Department of Education that places emerging concert and teaching artists within public schools to nurture arts education and appreciation among younger audiences.

    Miguel Frasconi (Miguel/Electronics/Piano) is a composer and improvisor specializing in the relationship between acoustic objects and musical form. His instrumentarium includes glass objects, electronics, laptop, and constructions of his own design. Miguel’s compositions include chamber music, operas, film, dance, and his array of activities have included collaborations with Balinese composers, operatic vocalists, Tibetan musicians, and laptop virtuosi. Miguel's music has been released on New Albion Records, Porter Records, and a recording of his string quartets will soon be out on Tzadik. Every Thursday this year he adds a new piece from his archives to his #audioTBT playlist at soundcloud.com/frasconimusic.

    Ryan Krause (Manchorus) did not furnish us with a bio. Perhaps he doesn’t care. Perhaps he prefers to remain a mystery. He’s got no website. We don’t know where he comes from or why he’s here. Maybe he didn’t exist before the work you’re experiencing today. We think he has a band. Maybe it’s called Dear Leader.

    Joan La Barbara (Joan/Spirit of Thomas Paine)is renowned for her unique vocabulary of extended vocal techniques influencing generations of composers and singers. Awards: “Demetrio Stratos” prize; DAAD-Berlin & Civitella Ranieri residencies, Guggenheim Fellowship; commissions for chamber ensembles, orchestra, chorus, interactive technology, dance, video and filmscores, including electronic/vocal score for Sesame Street. Her multi-layered textural compositions premiered at Festival d'Automne à Paris, Brisbane Biennial, Lincoln Center, MaerzMusik Berlin, Warsaw Autumn. Immersing the audience in her music, La Barbara placed the American Composers Orchestra around the audience for her sonic painting “in solitude this fear is lived”. La Barbara teaches music composition at NYU and is composing a new opera. joanlabarbara.com

    Levy Ingles Lorenzo (Manchorus) is a performer, instrument designer, and creative technologist living in New York. He performs and composes live-electronic music using musical instruments that he invents. As a percussionist, Levy performs with the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE) and co-founded the experimental theater & electronics performance duo: Radical 2. He is an electronic art consultant and engineers sound for Claire Chase and ICE. He holds a Master of Engineering degree from Cornell University and a Doctor of Musical Arts degree from Stony Brook University. In 2014, he had the pleasure of presenting his work in Brazil, Iceland, and Burning Man. levylorenzo.com

    Jeffrey Young (Jeff/Violin) is a violinist and composer from Brooklyn who specializes in experimental, rock, and classical music. Recent performance highlights include the Ecstatic Music Festival with his experimental group thingNY and Helado Negro, a score he created and performed for a dance by choreographer RoseAnne Spradlin at New York Live Arts, and a 15-day tour with the World/Inferno Friendship Society. Young has played on The Late Show with David Letterman and The Rachael Ray Show, and at the Lucerne Festival Academy, Bang on a Can, National Repertory Orchestra, and Aspen Festivals. He graduated from the Oberlin Conservatory in 2007.

    Greg Lojko (Sound Engineer) graduated with a Bachelor of Music from U Mass Lowell with a Sound Recording Emphasis. From there he moved out west to wind up running sound, lights, building sets and hunting for props at Dell'Arte International, the first school in the world to offer an MFA in Physical performance. He moved back east in 2011. From that point he has worked freelance at some great places: The Public, Skirball, The Park Ave Armory, Cedar Lake Ballet Company, HERE, Theater for a New Audience. Greg also enjoys doing carpentry and has a passion for sound.

    Haejin Han (Lighting Designer) is a lighting designer and a stage manager. Her lighting design credits are “Sunken Cathedral" "Anna Christie" "Flyin West" "Bound" "MoM a Rock Concert Musical" "Love at Home" and has worked with many dance companies including Elisa Monte, Gabriel Roth and Nimbus Dance Works. She is touring with "Burq off" production as stage manager/Lighting Designer in LA, SF, and UK. She was an assistant production manager in the "Brigadoon" on Broadway; she also was an assistant technical director for the "Hero" at Lincoln Center. She also received the outstanding stage manager award at the New York Innovative Theater awards, 2014.

    Brian McCorkle (Production Assistant) is a composer, musician, and performer. In addition to his work as What Color is Your Machine Gun? and with the composer's collective Varispeed, he is the Co-Director of the Panoply Performance Laboratory (PPL) with Esther Neff. PPL makes large scale performance art operas in addition to duo and small group performances around the world. PPL also operates a space for experimental music and performance in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. PPL is currently developing a new piece, Embarrassed of the Whole.

  • CULTUREMART Mar. 6-7, 2015

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Thursday
    3/5/2015

    Photo credit: Reuben Radding

    Photo credit: Reuben Radding

    http://www.here.org/shows/detail/1590/

    Tickets are still available for a work-in-progress showing. Runs about 50 min. and stars some of my favorite musicians in the city.

    Come by and listen.

  • “...feisty, profane and profound…” LA Times

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Sunday
    2/22/2015

    http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-et-cm-first-take-six-operas-review-20150223-column.html

    The LA Times says a few nice words about Unintelligible Response and five other new works in progress.

  • The Industry interview with Paul and Joan

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Sunday
    2/22/2015

    https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=816505908429305&set=vb.124606140952622&type=2&theater

    Here's a video interview The Industry LA produced in advance of their First Take series, featuring six opera scenes by six composers. Joan and I talk a bit about the project in a dark room.

  • Unintelligible Response in Los Angeles Feb. 21

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Thursday
    2/5/2015

    First Take 15 postcard

    First Take 15 postcard

    Feb. 21, 2015
    1:00-4:30pm

    First Take 15

    A West Coast Workshop of New Opera

    http://theindustryla.org/projects/project_firsttake15.php

    Joan and the wildUp Ensemble are performing a scene from our opera. Unintelligible Response pits the bitter spirit of Tom Paine in between broadcasts in a cosmic radio station. She argues with her insubordinate peers about definitions of poverty, 

    If you're in the LA area on Feb. 21, come out to this free performance at the Wallis Annenberg Center. Other works by Jenny Olivia Johnson, Nomi Epstein, Jason Thorpe Buchanan, Andrew McIntosh, Anne LeBaron.

  • CULTUREMART Performance March 6 and 7

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Wednesday
    2/4/2015

    Come see the first 50 min. of Thomas Paine in Violence on March 6 and 7 as part of CULTUREMART.

    http://www.here.org/shows/detail/1590/

    Next month's iteration of the work will feature a concert version of four independent scenes: On the Topic of the Inability to Communicate, Radio Edit, Hack It!, and Unintelligible Response. 

    The cast includes Joan La Barbara as the spirit of Thomas Paine, a chorus of vocalist/sound artists Alejandro Acierto, Ryan Krause, Levy Lorenzo, Paul Pinto, and the instrumentalist cast of Shelley Burgon (harp), Yves Dharamraj (cello), Miguel Frasconi (piano/electronics), and Jeffrey Young (violin).

    There's also going to be a talkback with some of the artists after the show on the 6th.

  • Interview on Clocktower Radio with Pete McCabe

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Wednesday
    1/7/2015

  • Oct. 26, 2014 - Thomas Paine scene at ISSUE Project Room

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Tuesday
    10/7/2014

    Photo: Bradley Buering

    Photo: Bradley Buering

    This is the first big work-in-progress showing of a scene from this opera. I hope you'll come out, enjoy the concert and offer feedback.

    Ne(x)tworks, the all-star music ensemble comprised of Joan La Barbara (voice), Ariana Kim (violin), Stephen Gosling (piano), Shelley Burgon (harp) and Yves Dharamraj (cello) play a cast of radio broadcasters conveying the radical philosophies of Thomas Paine on air and off. Also on the program: works by Gelsey Bell and Miguel Frasconi

    Sun. Oct 26
    5pm
    ISSUE Project Room
    22 Boerum Place
    Brooklyn, NY

    http://issueprojectroom.org/event/nextworks-plays-new-works-paul-pinto-gelsey-bell-miguel-frasconi

    GET TICKETS HERE

  • Hack It! video 9-2-14

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Tuesday
    10/7/2014

    Hack It! is a scene in progress. Recorded at HERE by myself and vocalist Ryan Krause. In this 9 minute collection of rants, the singers are transforming from speaking to singing. This is a technique I'll be playing around with a lot as I develop this piece. One of the questions: how long is this technique sustainable and interesting?

    Thanks to Markus and Amanda for the video help.

  • Audio Clip: Thomas Paine in Violence (Radio Edit)

    Posted by
    Paul Pinto
    Tuesday
    4/8/2014

    This radio broadcast from WQXR's Q2 station features Joan La Barbara as the voice of Thomas Paine's spirit and myself and Miguel Frasconi accompanying with electronics and samples. This first scene was commissioned by Experiments in Opera and performed live in March 2014 at Abrons Art Center.